Book Reviews

Review of Take a Deep Breath by mindfulmum.co.uk

Every new parent worries about their baby’s breathing, hovering over the moses basket and wondering if those noises are normal or if he/she can really breathe properly while breastfeeding. As the baby grows, worries expand to include nasty colds, choking, asthma and any number of other things that might cause a child difficulties.

Working with parents every day I thought this book might give me some tips to share, but I must admit I expected it to be aimed more at parents with children who have asthma or other breathing conditions. I could not have been more wrong! I found the book fascinating and, even with years of experience in childcare, I learnt a great deal about normal breathing at different ages. Did you know that a newborn baby can only breathe through his mouth if he is crying, the rest of the time he has to breathe through his nose?

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by reviewsbymolly.com

Take a Deep Breath is a comprehensive, accessible, and indispensible guide for parents, caregivers, teachers, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers on the subject of children s breathing issues. The book provides a thorough review of breathing issues, differentiating the normal and abnormal for all ages, and at all levels of breathing passages. Take a Deep Breathexplains all of the puzzling and oftentimes distressing breathing patterns our children have throughout development.From the uppermost part of the breathing apparatus, the nose, to the lowermost part, the lungs, this book explains which problems are truly worrisome, and which are actually normal stages in a child s growth. Take a Deep Breath will enable the reader to do just that, take a deep breath, and get a better, clearer understanding about what s going on when your children breathe in and out. While pediatricians and other healthcare providers have expertise in all aspects of childhood illness, this book sheds new light on the latest research in pediatric breathing issues, sleep issues, and airway safety. Consisting of age-based sections, with location-based and problem-based chapters for each age group, each chapter also provides a ‘to-do’ list, offering successful preventions and treatments that can easily be done at home.

About 80 to 90% of children, at one time or another, have breathing problems. Take a Deep Breath will be a welcome, indispensible tool in all households with children. Day care providers, grandparents, babysitters and nannies, and parents clubs will all benefit from this book immensely.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by theresabook.com

At some point during childhood, 80 to 90% of all children have a breathing problem. ‘Take a Deep Breath’ is a comprehensive, accessible, and indispensible guide for parents, caregivers, teachers, and healthcare providers on the subject of children’s breathing issues.
From the uppermost part of the airway — the nose, to the lowermost part — the lungs, Dr Nina Shapiro explains which problems are truly worrisome, and which are actually normal stages in a child’s growth. ‘Take a Deep Breath’ will enable you to do just that, take a deep breath, and get a better, clearer understanding of what’s going on when a child breathes in and out.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by twobearsfarm.com

After Cort’s asthma attack last month, I was excited to hear about the book Take a Deep Breath: Clear the Air for the Health of Your Child by Nina Shapiro, MD. TLC Book Tours contacted me about doing a review and giveaway, and I felt like the timing was perfect.
The book is broken up into the ages of newborn – 3 months, 3 months – 1 year, and 1-5 years. I found the book to be informative without being preachy, reassuring without being dismissive, and down-to-earth for the topic. In general, I think this is because Dr. Shapiro is a mom herself, which lends her an authenticity for the parents out there reading the book. She knows what it’s like to worry about a child, to put practicality first sometimes in the face of recommendations. She knows when to say, okay, maybe you don’t have to be a total stickler with this – versus, hey, I know it’s hard but this is something you’ve got to stand firm on. I like that philosophy.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by geekmom.com

There are plenty of challenges that we face as parents. Some are simple, like learning how to simultaneously change a diaper, finish a phone call and prevent your child from knocking over everything on the changing table. Others, like helping your child when they’re sick, are a lot more difficult and frightening. As Mom to a child with asthma, I’ve had my share of sleepless nights trying to decide if she needs to be dragged to the emergency room in the wee hours or if I should just ride it out until morning. And every time, no matter what I decided, I ended up second guessing myself. In an effort to help parents just like me, and you, Nina Shapiro, MD has written Take a Deep Breath to help us all understand how kids breath, and how to help them if they’re not breathing well.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by familyvolley.blogspot.com

When I am introduced to a “good thing”, I want to share. The hope is always that it helps someone else like it has helped me. Remember the headband hair tutorial. :) Well, I have run into a fantastic book that every parent should have. I know I wish I would have had it when we had our first child.

When we had our son over 9 years ago, I worried about everything. EVERYTHING. As a new parent, with little experience, any deviations from what seemed “normal”, was concerning. I remember the first time he got sick. He was stuffed up and having a hard time breathing. I didn’t sleep at all that night. I laid on the floor next to his crib and listened all night, making sure that I could hear him breath.

I remember pulling out all my “baby books”, looking for a resource that could tell me how worried I should be about him. Something to tell me about symtoms that should concern me, and when to call the doctor. I sure wish I had “Take a Deep Breath” back then. It would have calmed my fears, and helped me know how to handle the breathing and sickness. I would have gotten a lot more sleep. :)

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by momscleanairforce.org

“While there is nothing more frightening than the feeling of struggling to breathe, watching your child have breathing problems is magnitudes more terrifying.” Dr. Nina Shapiro, Take a Deep Breath.

When our children are infants we hover over their cribs, listening for that deep, methodical breath in and out before we tuck ourselves in for the night. Even when our children are toddlers and preschoolers we continue to listen for that breath. The breath is our source of life. Our bodies, when working properly, move air in and out of the lungs to keep us alive. We generally don’t give much thought to breathing, until a problem arises.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by groovygreenlivin.com

Around 11 p.m. most nights I begin my nightly ritual. This routine has been in place since my three boys were born. I methodically go from one bedroom to the next listening for the same sound. Sometimes I hear it right away and other times it takes a few seconds, but I don’t leave until the sound I’m waiting for is confirmed: their breath. Then I’m able to sleep.

When my kids were infants there were times when their breath sounded different or strange. There were nights when they would snore or hold their breath for what felt like an eternity.

Then came asthma. When one of my son’s was around 2 years old we started what became our annual trip to the hospital for severe breathing problems related to asthma. Watching him wheeze and struggle for a single breath is a vision that’s hard to shake. And I know I’m not alone. There are so many children and families afflicted with breathing issues.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by networkedblogs.com

I had the opportunity recently to read a copy of Nina Shapiro,MD ‘s book Take A Deep Breath. Oh how I wish this book had been around when my older two boys were babies! This book goes through breathing for babies up until age 5. I really feel that the first chapters for birth-3 months is a must read for every new parent. I don’t know how many times with my three I wondered “is that normal?” Dr. Shapiro clearly defines what is normal and why babies breathe the way they do. She also goes through some common and un-common problems as well. My older two boys both had acid reflux and now both have asthma. Fortunately Jace hasn’t presented any symptoms or signs.

What I really loved about this book was the question/answer sections. The questions we want answers to are already asked and then the answer is right there for easy referencing back to. At the end of each chapter Dr. Shapiro has a section where it tells you a summary, and when to worry. I really found that to be helpful. It puts the information into small bits that are easier to process.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by rakhealthmatters.wordpress.com

I thought I knew plenty about newborns. But I didn’t know that they areobligate nasal breathers, which means they cannot breathe through their mouths until they are around four months old.

I also didn’t really ever understand how to use saline solution to clear a new baby’s nose. (Four kids, and I never learned this? Imagine how many hours of sleep I lost!) Or that toxins from the clothes of a tobacco smoker are enough to cause irritation to the respiratory system.

Or that if you can hear a child snoring from the next room, it could indicate a significant sleep problem — such as sleep apnea.

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Review of Take a Deep Breath by Kalamazoo Parent

About 80 to 90% of children, at some time or another will have a breathing problem. Take a Deep Breath offers a very well organized, easy to read book about the things that can cause breathing problems in your child and should be on every parent’s bookshelf. Dr. Shapiro has broken up the book by the child’s age and is written in an easy question and answer type format, letting you easily scan the pages for the topic you are most interested in at the time. She includes in each section what you should and should not worry about and resources for further reading. She answers questions such as Can a Newborn Have Asthma?, Nebulizers: What’s in Them?, and Choking Hazards: What is Safe to Eat? This book is a great resource for the parents, grandparents and caregivers of children newborn – school age.

read the PDF here